Did you know that billions of dollars is sitting in lost superannuation accounts waiting for Australians to claim?

Lost super is a special term used to describe superannuation benefits that are recorded in the Lost Members Register. Your super benefits may be recorded as lost if your super fund cannot contact you due to changes in your member details or similar events. You may also have lost super if your account has not received any contributions in the past 5 years.
If you change jobs regularly or you have had part-time jobs while at school or university, then it is highly likely that you have more than one super account. On average, every working Australian has three super accounts.

Should I be concerned if I think I have lost superannuation?

Don’t worry if you haven’t kept track of your multiple accounts. It’s never too late, but you must locate your super accounts before you can roll them over into one super account.Generally, your super fund/s sends you a statement each year reporting your account balance and fund returns. If you’re not receiving these statements and/or don’t know which super funds that you belong to, then you have access to plenty of services to help you find your lost accounts, and increase your super benefits instantly.

 

 

 

 

 

How can I find out if I have lost superannuation?

  • Use the ATO’s SuperSeeker service (www.ato.gov.au/super) which searches the Lost Members Register and other ATO records, such as unclaimed super money, for your lost super accounts. You can also contact them on the phone for advice and information ( 13 28 65).
  • Try AUSfund (www.unclaimedsuper.com.au) which looks after the lost super of millions of Australians for some of the largest super funds in Australia. If they have your super, they will find it free.
  • Ask your current super fund if they offer a service for finding your lost super.
  • Ask your previous employers for the names of the super funds that received contributions on your behalf